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EPA Steps Up Phaseout of R-22 Refrigerant


Why is R-22 so high? The government doesn't want you to use it. The EPA mandated a phasedown program in the production of new R-22. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced its final phase down schedule regarding production and importation of HCFC-22 refrigerant. It calls for an immediate drop come this Jan. 1 from 51 million pounds allowed in 2014 to 22 million pounds in 2015. After that, 18 million pounds of new and imported R-22 will be allowed in 2016, 13 million pounds in 2017, nine million pounds in 2018, and four million pounds in 2019. No new or imported R-22 will be allowed as of Jan. 1, 2020.

 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced its final phase down schedule regarding production and importation of Difloraldichormethan gas R22. The only resolve is to replace the R22 equipment with the new R410a Equipment as mandated by the EPA. A full system 410a conversion by 2020

Click on the photo of R22 to find out how it will impact home sellers, home buyers.  

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Scheduled Changes for 2020

All manufacturing and production of HCFC will be banned. No demand for freon will be met by production of new freon, even for equipment purchased prior to 2010.
Licensed reclaimers will be permitted by the EPA to recycle existing HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b. New regulations for recycling and reuse will be implemented.
99.5% of freon will be phased out of the United States by limiting consumption and banning new production.

Scheduled Changes for 2030

All production, recycling, and distribution of HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b must end. This means that no old or new equipment will be charged with HCFC-142b or HCFC-22 freon beginning January 1, 2030.
HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b freon must be destroyed adhering to disposal guidelines and strict government law.
Possessing, using, or distributing HCFC-22 or HCFC-142b freon will be against the law.
100% of freon will be phased out of the United States by limiting consumption and banning new production.

What This Means for the Consumer
Regulation of Freon in HVAC Units

Any owner of cooling equipment which uses more than 50lbs of freon must repair all found leaks within 30 days of notice. Exceptions to this rule do exist and can be found on the Environmental Protection Agency website.
All HVAC equipment using more than 2,000 lbs of freon must install a special system that will detect leaks immediately. It is law that this equipment be monitored, maintained, and all details be reported.
As of January 1, 2010 it is illegal to charge any residential hvac equipment manufactured after January 1, 2010 with R-22 freon. Units manufactured before that date can still be charged with R-22 if serviceable. If unserviceable, they may be replaced from the manufacturers existing inventory of unused/unsold units if available, of R22 refrigerant units manufactured before January 1, 2010 or the newer units manufactured after January 1, 2010 which utilize R410a freon. Units manufactured after January 1, 2010 for residential use may only be charged with R410a freon if a leak occurs.
HVAC units purchased and installed prior to 2010 may be recharged under strict guidelines.
All activity with freon must be recorded and reported to the Environmental Protection Agency by the technician or wholesaler.